5 Delicious Foods to Roast on a Stick

 BBrianne Dela Cruz; Gather & Grow

 


 

 

 

  

Roasting hotdogs, loading up kabobs with assorted veggies, and making s’mores over a roaring fire paints a quintessential camp dinner picture. So many of my camp meals have consisted of this exact menu that cooking hot dogs, kabobs and s’mores is deeply ingrained in my outdoor cooking repertoire. And for good reason; roasting low-prep foods on a stick is one of the easiest and most gratifying ways to eat a meal under the stars.

 

After a long day adventuring outside, the last thing we want to do is spend an hour prepping dinner and another hour waiting for it to cook. Sometimes, all we need for dinner is something simple and delicious. Although, I’ll be first to admit, sometimes hotdogs, kabobs, and s’mores can get a little old. I love the ease of cooking with roasting sticks, but I also want a tasty meal that offers variety. With that in mind, I set out to explore new options to help us all expand our roasting-stick cooking prowess.

 

After some trial and error, I’ve put together alternative menu options full of elevated and mouth watering foods that are just as effortless and gratifying as the classics.

 

Here’s 5 new foods to roast
on skewers & sticks for dinner outdoors.


 

| 1 |
Pigs in a Blanket

Choose your favorite polish hot dog and wrap it in pre-made dinner roll dough to create an Oktoberfest-style pigs-in-a-blanket dinner. This is especially delicious dunked into stone ground dijon, and paired with a healthy serving of sauerkraut, skillet roasted cabbage, and beer. Prost!

 

 

 

| 2 |
Brussel Sprouts Wrapped in Bacon

One of my favorite ways to update the traditional kabob is by loading roasting sticks full of veggies wrapped in bacon. Brussel sprouts are my favorite, but you can wrap any hearty green veggie, such as asparagus or broccoli, in bacon for a tasty, hearty side dish.

 

 

  

| 3 |
Scallops

For campouts on the beach elevate your cook out with flame seared scallops. Salt the scallops before loading them onto the roasting sticks, then sear each side over open flame for a minute or two. I loved roasted scallops dipped into melted butter and sprinkled with a dash of paprika on top.
Pro Tip: fire roasted scallops pair well with veggie kabobs.

 

 

  

| 4 |
Apples

Introducing roasted caramel apple bites, my new favorite camp dessert. Green apple cubes roasted over hot coals are not a treat to be missed. The tartness of green apples retains its flavor well when cooked in the fire and softens to a sweet and tender dessert. After roasting, drizzle with caramel, then sprinkle cinnamon sugar and crushed walnuts on top for a delicious bite-sized caramel apple dessert.

 

 

 

| 5 |
Bananas for Vegan S’mores

Yes, the notion of roasted bananas was a shock to me too when I first heard about it. But, after speaking to a vegan friend of mine about alternatives for marshmallows in s’mores (then trying it myself), I’m hooked. Dare I say, I may never go back to those fake puffy white things again. Simply peel and cut the banana to marshmallow size then roast it over hot coals just as you would a marshmallow. Roasted bananas, melted chocolate, and graham crackers elevate s'mores to a whole new decedent, vegan level.

 

 

 

Roasting Stick Pro Tip:
The key to roasting foods over the campfire is to create a large bed of extremely hot coals prior to roasting. Flames will always singe and blacken food, so aim to cook by the heat permitting white and glowing coals near the bottom. The best way to do this is to start a wood fire about an hour before you intend to start cooking. After the logs break down into natural hot coals, load on charcoals to catch and maintain the heat longer. A hotbed of flameless coals will cook your dinner to perfection.

 


 ABOUT

Brianne Dela Cruz is a master gardener, wild forager, campfire foodie, and acclaimed writer and photographer. From her home in Salt Lake City, she teaches online gardening and foraging courses for modern folks and budding naturalists as well as hosts seasonal community gatherings. Brianne's blog and online school, Gather & Grow, is a community of folks exploring the intersection between nature and personal growth by discovering ways to slow down and nourish themselves with nature.  

 

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